Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Rembrandt Etchings from Major Academic Museums Brought Together in Exhibition at Oberlin’s Allen Memorial Art Museum

Rembrandt Etchings from Major Academic Museums Brought Together in Exhibition at Oberlin’s Allen Memorial Art Museum

OBERLIN, OHIO—Etchings by Rembrandt figure prominently in the collections of many American academic museums, in part because they reward close looking and appeal to a wide range of learners and visitors. Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings, an exhibition at the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College that runs from February 6 through May 13, 2018, brings together 60 prints by the 17th-century Dutch master.
The exhibition has been co-organized by the Allen with Cornell University’s Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art. Lines of Inquiry is curated jointly by Oberlin’s Curator of European and American Art Andaleeb Badiee Banta and Andrew C. Weislogel, the Seymour R. Askin, Jr. ’47 Curator of Earlier European and American Art at Cornell. In addition to prints from Oberlin and Cornell, the show includes etchings on loan from Harvard, Princeton, Syracuse, Vassar, Yale, the University of Kansas, the Morgan Library & Museum, and private collections. 
Rembrandt’s etchings have long been treasured for their technical innovation and perceptive portrayal of the human psyche. In the unique environment of the campus art museum, Rembrandt’s etchings have remained relevant even as pedagogical priorities have shifted, inspiring multidisciplinary teaching approaches, historical investigations, and technical studies. Lines of Inquiry highlights both the scope and subtlety of Rembrandt as an etcher of diverse subject matter, includingportraits, genre scenes, landscapes, nudes, and religious narratives. In addition, this multifaceted exhibition examines the artist’s enduring status as a printmaker who continually experimented with processes and materials. 
The exhibition explores how the technical study of these etchings and the papers on which they were printed reveal Rembrandt to be a savvy businessman. Research on the watermarks found in the papers can provide clues about the timelines of his print production and distribution. The exhibition introduces Cornell’s Watermark in Rembrandt Etchings (WIRE) project: a collaboration among museum staff, faculty members in art history and engineering, and students from many disciplines designed to digitally facilitate access to Rembrandt watermark scholarship. WIRE continues to pursue new watermark discoveries and expands knowledge about the artist through digital means. The exhibition includes a video on the WIRE project, along with a touchscreen interface that allows visitors to interact with the WIRE project database.

Catalogue:
The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue coauthored by Andaleeb Badiee Banta and Andrew C. Weislogel, which includes research on the history of Rembrandt prints in academic collections and their technical study through the WIRE project. The directors of the Oberlin and Cornell museums have contributed an essay recounting the extraordinary episode of the Allen’s secret guardianship of the Morgan’s Rembrandt etchings during World War II; it was written by Andria Derstine, John G. W. Cowles Director at the Allen, and Stephanie Wiles, the Richard J. Schwartz Director at Cornell. The catalogue is available for $30 by contacting member.amam@oberlin.edu.

Support:
At Oberlin, support for Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings has been provided by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc., as well as by Maryan and Chuck Ainsworth, Elaine A. Bridges, Andrew Butterfield and Claire Schiffman, Pamela and James Elesh, Sarah G. (Sally) Epstein and Donald Collins, Suzanne Hellmuth and Jock Reynolds, Brian and Mary Kennedy, Emily and T. K. McClintock, Donald Oresman, Betsy Pinover Schiff, Deborah and Andy Scott, Katherine Solender and Willie Katzin, Sietske and Herman Turndorf, Gloria Werner, the John H. and Marjorie Fox Wieland AMAM Support Fund, and the Friends of Art Fund.

Public programs:  

Sunday, February 25, 3:00 p.m. and Friday, April 13, at noon—Curator tours
Andaleeb Badiee Banta, the Allen’s curator of the loan exhibition Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings, gives a free tour.

Friday, March 16, 10:15 a.m.—AMAM in the AM
Exhibition tour by Andaleeb Badiee Banta, the Allen’s curator of European and American art, who co-curated the Rembrandt exhibition. This is part of an ongoing series of talks offered on the third Friday of the month, through May.

Thursday, April 5, 5:30 p.m. — First Thursday Evening Hours
Catherine Scallen, Andrew W. Mellon Associate Professor in the Humanities and associate professor of art history at Case Western Reserve University, gives a lecture titled “Rembrandt: The Last Renaissance Artist.” Rembrandt was a printmaker and painter of the 17th century, but his choice of subjects and thematic presentation allied him more with earlier Renaissance art. This free lecture examines this retrospective side of Rembrandt’s art and offers possible motivations—centering on his personal ambition as an artist. After Scallen’s talk, there will be a reception and galleries will remain open until 7:30 p.m.

Museum hours:
Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday 1 to 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and major holidays. 




Self-Portrait Leaning on a Stone Sill, showing Basilisk watermark, 1639
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606–1669)
Etching, with touches of drypoint; retouched in black chalk
Collection of Yale University Art Gallery
Transmitted light photograph courtesy of Theresa Fairbanks-Harris

Thursday, January 25, 2018

NEW ART EXHIBIT AT UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON FEATURES WORKS BY ALUMNUS

NEW ART EXHIBIT AT UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON FEATURES WORKS BY ALUMNUS

A new exhibit at the University of Dayton examines the American identity through works by alumnus and artist Jonathan Clyde Frey. "American Mythologies" runs Jan. 18 through Feb. 15 in the Radical Gallery on the second floor of Fitz Hall. The opening reception will be held at 5 p.m. Jan. 25. Frey says his work focuses on "the differences between the iconic representations of the United States and the lived experience." Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Wednesday; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday. Parking passes are available from the parking attendant located on the University Circle inside the main entrance. For additional information contact gallery coordinator Nicholaus Arnold at 937-229-3204 or 
narnold1@udayton.edu.

Noteworthy Illustrator Sutphin to Present at MVNU Lecture/Artist Series

Noteworthy Illustrator Sutphin to Present at MVNU Lecture/Artist Series
MOUNT VERNON, Ohio — Mount Vernon Nazarene University is pleased to host Joe Sutphin as part of the MVNU 2017-18 Lecture/Artist Series. An illustrator for children’s books such as the New York Times bestseller “Word of Mouse” by James Patterson, Sutphin will visit MVNU on Wednesday, Feb. 14 and Thursday, Feb. 15.
Paragraphs Bookstore, 229 S. Main St., will host a book signing event with Sutphin on Wednesday from 4-5:30 p.m. where he will discuss his latest illustrations in “Raffie on the Run” by Jacqueline Resnick.
He will speak on his spiritual journey and career on the main campus on Thursday, Feb. 15 at 7:30 p.m., in Thorne Performance Hall which is free and open to the public.
Sutphin began drawing when he was younger. He left art school when he was 20 years old but still continued to tell stories and draw. In 2003 he began a children’s art portfolio and then found himself being mentored by Tony DiTerlizzi, the creator of “The Spiderwick Chronicles.” Sutphin gives DiTerlizzi credit for being an encouragement in his time of becoming an artist. Stuphin’s work in James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein’s “Word of Mouse” has been reviewed as “reminiscent of Garth Williams’s work in ‘Stuart Little’” by Publishers Weekly.






For more information on Sutphin visit joesutphin.com.

Marietta College's Gallery 310 offers new exhibition starting on Feb. 16

For more information contact: Tom Perry, Executive Director of Communication & Brand Management, (740) 376-4408, perryt@marietta.edu
Marietta College's Gallery 310 offers new exhibition starting on Feb. 16
'Painterly Intricacies' opens with a reception from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at HFAC
MARIETTA, OHIO (01/23/2018) Five years after it opened, Marietta College's Gallery 310 will host the exhibition, "Painterly Intricacies: Selected Artwork from the Dr. Richard Krause Collection and Visiting Painter, Kaveri Raina."

The exhibition opens with a special reception from 5:00-7:00 p.m., Friday, February 16th, on the third floor of the Hermann Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from noon-4:00 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, or by appointment at gallery310@marietta.edu. Gallery 310 observes all Marietta College holidays and breaks.

The exhibition and opening are free and open to the public. Included in the exhibition will be selections from the same Krause collection as the inaugural 2013 exhibition.

In addition to the following collection artists: Maqbool Fida Husain, Jamini Roy and most notably, Francis Newton Souza, Gallery 310 has invited contemporary painter, Kaveri Raina to be part of the exhibition. F.N Souza was a founder of the Progressive Artists Group, an influential collective of artists in India. Formed in 1947, as India emerged a free nation gaining independence from British Rule, PAG proudly presented Indian subject matter in new styles that drew on Post-Impressionistic use of color, Cubist forms, and Expressionistic brushwork.

Raina was born and brought up in New Delhi, India. In May 2016, she graduated with her MFA in Painting and Drawing from The School of the Art Institute in Chicago. She is the recipient of the James Nelson Raymond Fellowship and recently finished Artist in Residencies at Ox Bow in Saugatuck, Michigan, and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. She is represented by Hammond Harkins Gallery in Columbus.

Gallery 310 at Marietta College aims to present diverse and stimulating exhibitions, which will enrich the artistic culture and education of the campus, community, and region. Gallery 310 supports teaching, learning, and exploration in the liberal arts through rotating exhibitions and related programs. Gallery 310 is a place for intellectual curiosity, shared programming with the greater campus community, and a teaching space for students looking to enhance their experience for future careers in gallery and museum-related fields.

Located in Marietta, Ohio, at the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio rivers, Marietta College is a four-year liberal arts college. Tracing its roots to the Muskingum Academy begun in 1797, the College was officially chartered in 1835. Today Marietta College serves a body of 1,200 full-time students. The College offers 45 majors and has been listed among Barron's Best Buys in College Education and Peterson's Competitive Colleges, and has been recognized as one of the top regional comprehensive colleges by U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review, as well as one of the nation's best by Forbes.com.


"Touchy Eye"


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'Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame' traveling photo exhibit

'Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame' traveling photo exhibit

GRANVILLE, Ohio — Denison University presents “Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame,” a traveling photo exhibit emerging from the University of Dayton’s Human Rights Center and PROOF: Media for Social Justice, on display from Monday, Feb. 5, to Friday, Feb. 23, in the atrium of the William Howard Doane Library (400 West Loop). A panel talk with University of Dayton staff and students who curated the exhibit will take place at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 12, in the library atrium. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Denison Museum at 740-587-6255,museum@denison.edu, or visit Denison.edu.

“Ferguson Voices” is part of the Moral Courage Project, a team of University of Dayton students and program coordinators who conducted oral history research in Ferguson, Mo., in May 2016. Featuring powerful portraits and compelling audio recordings of the events from people in the community, the exhibit provides critical texture to the story of Ferguson by focusing on profiles that fracture the dominant narrative. “Ferguson Voices” highlights the contributions of average people who found the courage to stand up during moments of unrest.

The exhibit is sponsored by Denison’s Programs in Narrative Nonfiction Writing and Black Studies, Denison Library, and Denison Museum.

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CALENDAR LISTING, Denison University, Granville— “Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame” exhibit on display from Monday, Feb. 5, to Friday, Feb. 23, in the atrium of the William Howard Doane Library (400 West Loop). Free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Denison Museum at 740-587-6255 or visit Denison.edu.
CALENDAR LISTING, Denison University, Granville— “Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame” exhibit talk at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 12, in the atrium of the William Howard Doane Library (400 West Loop). Free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Denison Museum at 740-587-6255 or visit Denison.edu.

Emory Douglas presents an artist talk


Emory Douglas presents an artist talk

GRANVILLE, Ohio — The Denison Museum and the Department of History welcome Emory Douglas, renowned revolutionary artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, for an artist talk at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at the Denison Museum (240 West Broadway). This talk is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the museum at 740-587-6255, museum@denison.edu, or visit Denison.edu.

Douglas made his mark on American culture through his thoughtful and provocative graphic work. He served as art director and lead illustrator for the Black Panther Party’s newspaper, for which he created widely distributed prints that now reflect American history and society in the 1960s and 1970s.

Douglas’ work is on display from Monday, Feb. 5, to Friday, May 4, during the museum’s regular hours from noon to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Due to construction, the museum is limited to the ground floor entrance. Please follow signs.

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CALENDAR LISTING, Denison University, Granville—Artist Talk by Emory Douglas, renowned revolutionary artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at the Denison Museum (240 West Broadway). Free and open to the public. For more information, contact the museum at 740-587-6255, museum@denison.edu, or visit Denison.edu.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

“Range of Vision,” featuring Ohio Wesleyan’s fine arts faculty members

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES FEBRUARY 2018 PUBLIC EVENTS


DELAWARE, Ohio – Ohio Wesleyan University today announced its February 2018 lineup of public events. Unless otherwise noted, admission is free. For the latest OWU event information, visit www.owu.edu/calendar or “like” www.facebook.com/OhioWesleyanUniversityNews. For a list of Battling Bishop athletics events, visit www.battlingbishops.com.

Jan. 17-March 30, 2018 – “Range of Vision,” featuring Ohio Wesleyan’s fine arts faculty members exhibiting their latest creations, featuring works in clay, metal, painting and drawing, fabric, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and graphic design, at the Richard M. Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. The exhibition will open with a free artists’ reception from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 18. Participating faculty are Kristina Bogdanov, David Bugay, Cynthia Cetlin, Frank Hobbs, James Krehbiel, Jeffrey Nilan, and Jonathan Quick. Learn more about them at www.owu.edu/finearts. During the academic year, the museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is handicap-accessible and admission is always free. Call (740) 368-3606 or visit www.owu.edu/ross for more information.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

A CREATIVE ‘RANGE OF VISION’ Ohio Wesleyan’s Fine Arts Faculty to Exhibit Latest Works at Ross Art Museum

A CREATIVE ‘RANGE OF VISION’
Ohio Wesleyan’s Fine Arts Faculty to Exhibit Latest Works at Ross Art Museum


DELAWARE, Ohio – Ohio Wesleyan University’s fine arts faculty will showcase their artistic “Range of Vision” in a new exhibition featuring creations in clay, fiber, metal, painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and graphic design.
“Range of Vision” will be on display from Jan. 17 to March 30 at Ohio Wesleyan’s Richard M. Ross Art Museum, 60 S. Sandusky St., Delaware. A free, public artists’ reception with the faculty will be held from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 18 to kick off the show.


Ohio Wesleyan faculty members showcasing artwork in the exhibition are:
Kristina Bogdanov, M.F.A., an associate professor who teaches ceramics, drawing, figure drawing, and 3-D design. “Memory is vital to shaping us into who we are,” said Bogdanov, who joined the university in 2007. “In a society that is obsessed to record reality on a daily basis, is it possible to question a real memory? Selectivity informs my work in a same way as the firing process transforms clay to structure into solid fa├žade. The meaningful paradox of clay becoming stronger in fire is in direct relation to clay’s memory. My work is oxymoron, a retrieved virtual reality in fossilized form.”

Cynthia Cetlin, M.F.A., a professor who teaches metals, 3-D design, art education, art history, and, most recently, fiber arts. “After more than three decades of metalsmithing, the sensuous media of silk, wool and natural dyeing offer inspiring new possibilities,” said Cetlin, a member of the OWU faculty since 1987. “I am energized by the anticipation and the subsequent discovery as a new work emerges from a dye pot, or a new mold, or develops from a new pattern for a three-dimensional object. … The sheer joy of process and creation of objects keeps me going.”

Frank Hobbs, M.F.A., an associate professor who teaches painting, drawing, figure drawing, and 2-D design. Hobbs describes his paintings as “personal responses to particular situations that I’ve encountered in my wanderings in Ohio and in Italy.” “In working from observation,” said Hobbs, a member of the OWU faculty since 2007, “it’s the visual eccentricities of a given motif, their resistance to generalities that I find most exciting and engaging. The act of painting, for me, speaks of an underlying order and connectedness that it is my struggle and my delight to discover and to share.”

James Krehbiel, M.F.A., a professor who teaches in the 2-D media of printmaking, computer imaging, and drawing. Krehbiel’s work represents his research into sacred, prehistoric landscapes of the American West, including kivas. “Often kivas are isolated on remote ledges high in the canyons, but sometimes they are positioned in interesting ways in villages with alignments to unusual features in the landscape,” said Krehbiel, a member of the OWU faculty since 1986. His digital prints involve layering images taken over time to create narratives of the spaces he explores.

Jeff Nilan, M.F.A., an associate professor who teaches photography, computer imaging, bookmaking, and 2-D design. His pieces for the faculty exhibit include “Big Horn Canto,” taken out West. Nilan joined the OWU faculty in 2008 and of his teaching has said: “Teaching in a creative discipline is about drawing a student’s intuitive knowledge to the surface. … My ultimate goal is to enable each student to locate their own voice and then to effectively communicate that voice using the visual language.”

Jonathan Quick, M.F.A., a part-time professor who teaches sculpture and 3-D design. Quick works in natural materials, primarily wood, metal, and stone. “There are three distinct directions in my studio production,” said Quick, who joined the university in 1988. “Iron foundry, in which art pieces are produced by the casting process; metal fabrication, in which cutting and welding are used to build sculpture; and woodworking. … In some of my work I seek form that invokes the natural forces implied by the process.”

David Bugay, B.F.A., a part-time instructor who teaches graphic design. “As a Graphic Designer, my style needs to be flexible to best fit the needs of the clients I work for. I get my inspiration from the world around me,” Bugay said. “Sometimes it is simply how the light is reflecting off of a window or how a certain building was designed. Other times [I] see the work of a certain artist and truly connect with their work.”



Ohio Wesleyan fine arts professor Jonathan Quick’s “Tipsy martini table for Larry Poons,” a creation of white ash, cherry, walnut, and steel, will be on display beginning Jan. 17 at OWU’s Richard M. Ross Art Museum. The exhibition includes work from seven OWU fine arts faculty members. (Photo courtesy of the Ross Art Museum)


Ohio Wesleyan offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with majors in studio art, art education, and art history. Learn more about the OWU Department of Fine Arts and its faculty at www.owu.edu/finearts.
During the academic year, the Ross Art Museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is closed for winter break until Jan. 17, when classes resume. It will close for spring break March 11 and reopen March 20. The museum is handicap-accessible and admission is always free. Call (740) 368-3606 or visitwww.owu.edu/ross for more information.

Friday, January 5, 2018

Researcher wins an NIH grant and public comment is sought for University reaccreditation. Professional development opportunities, a Marian forum and a new art exhibit are among upcoming events.

NEW ART EXHIBIT AT UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON FEATURES WORKS BY ALUMNUS

A new exhibit at the University of Dayton examines the American identity through works by alumnus and artist Jonathan Clyde Frey. “American Mythologies” runs Jan. 18 through Feb. 15 in the Radical Gallery on the second floor of Fitz Hall. The opening reception will be held at 5 p.m. Jan. 25. Frey says his work focuses on “the differences between the iconic representations of the United States and the lived experience.” Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Wednesday; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday. Parking passes are available from the parking attendant located on the University Circle inside the main entrance. For additional information contact gallery coordinator Nicholaus Arnold at 937-229-3204 ornarnold1@udayton.edu.


UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON RESEARCHER WINS $439K NIH GRANT

University of Dayton biologist Amit Singh is studying early eye development in fruit flies to understand the molecular basis of retinal disease and birth defects in the human eye under a new $439,499 grant from the National Institutes of Health. Singh, associate professor of biology and interim director of the Center for Tissue Regeneration and Engineering at Dayton (TREND), is using the fruit fly eye model to determine how genes regulate the process of transforming a single layer of cells into a three-dimensional organ. More information is available hereFor interviews, contact assistant director of news and communications Meagan Pant atmpant1@udayton.edu or 937-229-3256.


FORUM EXAMINES VIRGIN MARY — YESTERDAY AND TODAY

The International Marian Research Institute (IMRI) will help chart the future of Marian studies by evaluating the current state of this theological discipline and identifying the latest trends and areas of neglect. IMRI will present its findings at its next Marian Forum at the University of Dayton April 6. Being organized around the theme of “Mary — Yesterday and Today,” the two-hour forum will be the sixth in a continuing series of free academic gatherings that IMRI has been sponsoring online to promote the study of the Blessed Virgin Mary. More information is available here. For interviews, contact assistant director of news and communications Meagan Pant atmpant1@udayton.edu or 937-229-3256.


PUBLIC COMMENT SOUGHT FOR UNIVERSITY REACCREDITATION 

The University of Dayton is seeking comments from the public about the University in preparation for its periodic evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The University will host a visit Feb. 12-13, 2018, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission. The University of Dayton has been accredited by HLC since 1928. The team will review the institution's ongoing ability to meet HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation. The public is invited to submit comments regarding the University to the following address: Public Comment on the University of Dayton, Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411. The public may also submit comments on the HLC website. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by Jan. 12.


UPCOMING UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS

Emerging Leader Program

Employers can help develop future executive leaders with training on the finer points of leadership and business skills during the 2018 Emerging Leader program at the University of Dayton Center for Leadership. Registration is now open for the next 12-month, 20-session program that begins Jan. 18, and is geared toward helping employees chart a path to executive leadership. Presenters include faculty from the University of Dayton's School of Business Administration along with consultants to Fortune 500 companies. The Emerging Leader Program is open to the public and costs $13,000; $12,000 for partner organizations. Participants receive a certificate in leadership and admission to two of the Center's future executive development programs.

Supervisory Leadership Certificate Program

The Center for Leadership is accepting applications for the next two sessions of this 10-session program that start Jan. 18 and April 17. The Supervisory Leadership Certificate Program is a development program spanning six months for leaders in public, private and not-for-profit organizations. This program will assist front-line leaders or anyone preparing for a leadership role in developing skills to help them maximize individual and team performance. Upon completion of the program, they also receive two additional days of Supervisor and Professional Development programs. The cost is $4,300; $4,000 for partner organizations. Supervisory Leadership Certificate facilitators average a 4.5 on a five-point scale in participant reviews. Participants in the most recently completed cohort report a 43.5 percent increase in their competency level. One participant said: "I have found most valuable the ability to listen to and to be exposed to individuals from all over the region, as well as to be able to share in their insights and gain an appreciation for the similarities and differences among us."

Professional Development Programs

Jan. 17: "Profiling Your Success: Using 360 Degree Feedback for Career Development." Participants will learn how to assess their strengths and contributions to their organizations and feedback from supervisors, peers and employees.

Jan. 25: "Coaching and Evaluating Performance." This session is designed to enhance management and coaching skills to help employees develop skills or correct performance.

The cost for a professional development program is $395 for the general public, $345 for University of Dayton alumni and $299 for center partners.

All sessions for every program run all day, unless otherwise noted, and will be on the University of Dayton River Campus at the 1700 South Patterson Building.

For more information about Center for Leadership programs and to register, call 937-229-3115 or visit the Center for Leadership website